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After you purchase each video, we will email you access instructions and directions

Ellen Barnard, MSSW

Three (3) webinars 

  • 5 hours of webinars 
  • PowerPoint slides
  • Post-Test & Evaluation (required for CEU)

**Earn up to 5 AASECT CEUs (Texas LPC, LMFT, LCSW and Psychologist CEUs included)

Aging and Sexual Health: Issues and solutions. 1.5 CEUs
Cancer's effects on sexual wellness and strategies for addressing these effects. 2 CEUs
Non-pharmacologic approaches to addressing common sexual dysfunctions: Learn when and how to recommend different types of lubricants, vibrators, dilators, pumps, erection rings and more. 1.5 - 2 hours

AGING & SEXUAL HEALTH: ISSUES & SOLUTIONS

Background

As we get older we all experience changes in our sexuality and sexual function. These changes may be experienced as positive, negative or neutral. There are many factors that determine how and how much these aspects of our lives change as we age. This program is appropriate for all types of sexuality professionals and health care providers.

Objectives

  • To understand the most common changes to sexuality and sexual function related to aging and chronic disease
  • To identify the interventions available to help clients address concerns so that they may enjoy satisfactory sexual lives

CANCER'S EFFECTS ON SEXUAL WELLNESS AND STRATEGIES FOR ADDRESSING THESE EFFECTS

Background

Increasing numbers of cancer patients are surviving, and they and their partners often experience distress and dissatisfaction related to changes in their sexual functioning and relationships. This workshop will offer sexuality professionals and health care providers concrete strategies for addressing the concerns of cancer survivors and partners in order to support healthy and thriving intimacy after cancer.

Objectives

  • To understand the ways that cancer treatment affects both the sexuality of a person with cancer and their intimate relationships.
  • Learn useful tools and approaches to help clients create satisfying intimacy with themselves and their partner(s).

Non-pharmacologic approaches to addressing common sexual dysfunctions: Learn when and how to recommend different types of lubricants, vibrators, dilators, pumps, erection rings and more

Background

The complex nature of sexuality and sexual function means that there are very few medications available to “treat” sexual concerns. This webinar will offer a variety of options for addressing the physiologic and cognitive reasons for the most common sexual dysfunctions using an integrative approach that utilizes education and easily available products. We will dive deeply into the distinguishing features of lubricants, vibrators, erection rings, pumps, dilators and more, so that participants can confidently make effective recommendations.

Objectives

  • Identify the types of common sexual dysfunction that can be addressed through the use of commonly-available sexual health products.
  • Participants will be able to describe to someone how to choose appropriate lubricants for different situations, appropriate vibrators for different needs, and appropriate erectile aids for different situations.

THEse SESSIONS HAVE BEEN RECORDED AND VIDEOS ARE AVAILABLE NOW!

David Ley, PHD

Two (2) webinars Available!

  • 1.5 hour webinars
  • PowerPoint slides
  • 1.5 AASECT CEUs per webinar
  • Post-Test & Evaluation (required for CEU)

Earn up to 3 AASECT CEUs (Texas LPC, LMFT, LCSW and Psychologist CEUs included)

ETHICAL PORN FOR DICKS: THE CLINICIAN’S GUIDE TO ENCOURAGING RESPONSIBLE PORN USE

Background

A growing body of research is identifying that a majority of the people struggling to manage their use of Internet pornography, are people with strong religious values towards sex. Many people who’ve grown up in conservative religious environments have received little education or understanding regarding their sexual feelings, and often feel overwhelmed by the level of sexual material readily available on the Internet. Religious participation is a protective factor from drug/alcohol problems, but poses a risk factor for people to feel overwhelmed, ashamed and frightened of their own sexual desires and behaviors. Therapists can be most effective by helping these patients to examine and resolve the conflict between their sexual values and their sexual choices. In this talk, Dr. Ley reviews the most recent research on the intersection between religious values and problematic porn use, to assist learners in better understanding these problems. Then, he uses his depth of experience and knowledge to help therapists begin to develop ways to assist patients in both understanding, and resolving these conflicts in a patient-centered, evidence-based, and sexuality-informed manner.

Objectives

  • Be able to apply recent research on religion and pornography use to their patient formulation, when patients present with porn-related problems;
  • Use a patient-centered strategy to assist patients in developing a better understanding of their feelings and attitudes towards their use of pornography;
  • Understand the ways in which these unresolved and unexamined conflicts contribute to feelings of shame, fear, lack of control, and depression;
  • Assist patients exploring ways to examine the conflicts between their use of pornography and their sexual values;
  • Support patients in developing an integration between their values for healthy, ethical and moral sex, with the sexual behaviors they choose to pursue. 

NAVIGATING RELIGION, SEX, AND PORN

BACKGROUND

A growing body of research is identifying that a majority of the people struggling to manage their use of Internet pornography, are people with strong religious values towards sex. Many people who’ve grown up in conservative religious environments have received little education or understanding regarding their sexual feelings, and often feel overwhelmed by the level of sexual material readily available on the Internet. Religious participation is a protective factor from drug/alcohol problems, but poses a risk factor for people to feel overwhelmed, ashamed and frightened of their own sexual desires and behaviors. Therapists can be most effective by helping these patients to examine and resolve the conflict between their sexual values and their sexual choices. In this talk, Dr. Ley reviews the most recent research on the intersection between religious values and problematic porn use, to assist learners in better understanding these problems. Then, he uses his depth of experience and knowledge to help therapists begin to develop ways to assist patients in both understanding, and resolving these conflicts in a patient-centered, evidence-based, and sexuality-informed manner.

OBJECTIVES

  • Be able to apply recent research on religion and pornography use to their patient formulation, when patients present with porn-related problems;
  • Use a patient-centered strategy to assist patients in developing a better understanding of their feelings and attitudes towards their use of pornography;
  • Understand the ways in which these unresolved and unexamined conflicts contribute to feelings of shame, fear, lack of control, and depression;
  • Assist patients exploring ways to examine the conflicts between their use of pornography and their sexual values;
  • Support patients in developing an integration between their values for healthy, ethical and moral sex, with the sexual behaviors they choose to pursue. 

Marty Klein, PHD

Four (4) Webinars Available!

  • 1 hour webinars
  • PowerPoint slides 
  • 1 AASECT CEU per webinar
  • Post-Test & Evaluation (required for CEU)

Earn up to 4 AASECT CEUs (Texas LPC, LMFT, LCSW and Psychologist CEUs included)

Background

Most people say they want pleasure and closeness from sex, but during sex they typically focus on how they look, smell, and sound; obsess on what their partner is thinking; try to manage distracting thoughts & feelings; and most of all, attend to their performance.

That leads exactly to what so many people fear: sexual “dysfunctions” like erection, orgasm, or desire problems. Therapists and self-help books can make things worse, because they’re trying to improve “functioning”—which is exactly wrong. Better friction doesn’t give people what they really want from sex: a sense of relaxation, playfulness, self-acceptance, and connection. Erections and lubrication don’t guarantee desire or satisfaction. And so treating people’s genitalia is the wrong approach to enhancing their passion or pleasure.

Objectives

  • To describe how people make sex difficult for themselves
  • To describe how to help people enjoy sex more
  • To assess and discuss patients’ narratives about sex and their sexuality

Four Presentations Available by Dr. Marty Klein

  1. Infidelity: After an affair, who owns the relationship? 
  2. If it isn't “sex addiction,” what is it? And how do you treat it?
  3. Power dynamics in intimate relationships  
  4. Intakes: Doing a first session so there’s a second session

One webinar for $49

Any three for $119

ALL four for $149 (this special, get the 4th one FREE)